• Description
  • Specs
  • Method
  • THIS ROBOT IS COMPLETELY MANUAL!

    Handmade, assembled and tested in Hong Kong, the Cafelat Robot is the plastic-free manual espresso maker that's fun to use as it looks.

    Make real espresso with the Robot. This small, high-quality, manual coffee maker is assembled from only has a handful of parts, has no complicated electronics and is built from only premium materials like stainless steel. Add fresh ground coffee, boiling water from a kettle, a little practice and you can add great home espresso to your coffee skill set. The whole process is simple and only takes a few minutes.

    Though it may look like one, this isn't a toy from a bygone era. The Robot is a tool for home baristas and is capable of pulling espresso shots like a professional machine costing much more. Capable of producing 9 bar pressure, but preferring 6-7 bar, this machine is built to withstand the work demanded of it, like all good robots should be. The lever arms and internal piston force the hot water through the coffee creating the thick, syrupy, delicious espresso, for the perfect start to the day, mid-day boost or after dinner digestif.

    • AVAILABLE MODELS: Standard or Barista
    • AVAILABLE COLOURWAYS: Matte Black, Blue, Red and Retro Green
    • SIZE: 300 x 230 x 160mm / 11.8 x 9 x 6.3in
    • WEIGHT 2.8kg / 6.2lb
    • RESEVOIR CAPACITY: 80ml / 2fl
    • PORTAFILTER DIAMETER: 58mm / 2.3in
    • IN THE BOX:
      • The main body of the Robot with the arms and base assembled
      • 1 x Portafilter
      • 1 x Portafilter Split-Spout
      • 1 x Professional Basket
      • 1 x Tamper
      • 1 x Stainless Steel Dispersion Screen
      • 1 x Silicone Base Mat
      • Pressure Gauge (Barista version ONLY)
      • Piston Blanking Plug (Barista version ONLY)
      • Teflon Washer (Barista version ONLY)
  • Cafelat Robot - Online User Manual

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Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
100%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
W
W.Y. (Aurora, CA)
Excellent build quality and great espresso

I upgraded from my Breville Cafe Roma to the Cafelat Robot standard. The espresso made from this machine is noticeably richer and sweeter than the breville after dialing in my grind setting; I use a Kingrinder K3. I also think the workflow is actually easier and more efficient on the robot (I don't have to wait for the machine to warm up/ temperature surfing, etc) I love the retro look and the building quality is top notch. Overall, I enjoy using this machine daily and I'm very satisfied with this purchase.

R
Ruth F. (Invermere, CA)
Coffee

THis machine is well made!! My husband loves his espresso in the morning. It looks nice on the counter too!!

K
Kevin W. (Calgary, CA)
Fantastic espresso

I own the Cafelat Robot, Standard Model. Before I bought it, I could not find a clear explanation of the included basket type. The published Cafelat Robot documentation lists "1 basket of your choice", a professional non-pressurized one or a pressurized one. For others wondering, the Standard Model at Eight Ounce Coffee comes with the professional non-pressurized basket in the sealed box.

The espresso from the Robot can be sublime. All the nuances of freshly roasted single-origin beans are evident, and the overall flavor is intense as espresso should be. Properly dialed in, the coffee has no sourness, no bitterness, no smokiness, and is sweet if the beans are sweet. I'm describing an ideal espresso for me, of course, but that is what comes out of the Robot for me. In a word, fantastic.

Achieving really good espresso required tinkering and tasting. I started in the middle of the espresso grind range on my grinder. Then I tried the 5-10 second preinfusion at low pressure suggested in the Robot instructions. The coffee came out sour, and grinding finer only "choked" the Robot (made the shots harder to pull). Fortunately, two tips changed the coffee for the better.

I discovered somewhat hard (medium-light to medium roast) beans greatly benefit from a longer preinfusion. 15 seconds just quells sourness. 30 seconds lets bitterness sneak in. 15-30 seconds is now my working range for good flavor.

After moving away from sour coffee, I sometimes still needed to push extremely hard on the Robot arms to produce a full 60 mL of espresso, needed to maintain pressure for over 60 seconds to achieve the desired volume, or cut the pulls at 30s before obtaining the target volume. The long pulls created overly bitter shots, and pull times were inconsistent. Finally, I learned not tamping the grinds in the basket was the key to consistency. First I use a small two-prong dessert fork to break clumps and distribute the grinds in the basket. (No specialized WDT needle tool required.) Then I gently place the Robot tamper in the basket, careful not to drop, rotate, or press it -- only to check that it sits level. (Just look straight down to see the tamper handle is centred in the basket.) Finally, I remove the tamper without disturbing the coffee bed. All this sounds trivial, but pressing the grinds down a little or a lot just makes the pull unnecessarily hard. No tamping also minimizes channeling and boosts the amount of crema.

For the record, I preheat the basket and portafilter on top of a kettle. My glassware is warmed with hot tap water. (Avoid preheating with kettle water as extra heat robs pulled espresso of sweetness.) I use a KinGrinder K4, typically feeding 13 g of beans at 63 clicks to the Robot. I wet a Robot paper filter, stick it to the underside of the Robot metal screen, and gently place the paper and screen on top of the coffee bed (after leveling with a fork and verifying with the tamper).

The Robot is for people who want to understand espresso and take control of every aspect affecting output. It is worth the price when you realize it is cheaper and far more adjustable than electric machines using unpressurized baskets. That level of adjustment is not for the sake of tinkering. It is about reliably getting the best flavors, which is why I use the Robot. I hope this helps others considering the Robot.

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
100%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
W
W.Y. (Aurora, CA)
Excellent build quality and great espresso

I upgraded from my Breville Cafe Roma to the Cafelat Robot standard. The espresso made from this machine is noticeably richer and sweeter than the breville after dialing in my grind setting; I use a Kingrinder K3. I also think the workflow is actually easier and more efficient on the robot (I don't have to wait for the machine to warm up/ temperature surfing, etc) I love the retro look and the building quality is top notch. Overall, I enjoy using this machine daily and I'm very satisfied with this purchase.

R
Ruth F. (Invermere, CA)
Coffee

THis machine is well made!! My husband loves his espresso in the morning. It looks nice on the counter too!!

K
Kevin W. (Calgary, CA)
Fantastic espresso

I own the Cafelat Robot, Standard Model. Before I bought it, I could not find a clear explanation of the included basket type. The published Cafelat Robot documentation lists "1 basket of your choice", a professional non-pressurized one or a pressurized one. For others wondering, the Standard Model at Eight Ounce Coffee comes with the professional non-pressurized basket in the sealed box.

The espresso from the Robot can be sublime. All the nuances of freshly roasted single-origin beans are evident, and the overall flavor is intense as espresso should be. Properly dialed in, the coffee has no sourness, no bitterness, no smokiness, and is sweet if the beans are sweet. I'm describing an ideal espresso for me, of course, but that is what comes out of the Robot for me. In a word, fantastic.

Achieving really good espresso required tinkering and tasting. I started in the middle of the espresso grind range on my grinder. Then I tried the 5-10 second preinfusion at low pressure suggested in the Robot instructions. The coffee came out sour, and grinding finer only "choked" the Robot (made the shots harder to pull). Fortunately, two tips changed the coffee for the better.

I discovered somewhat hard (medium-light to medium roast) beans greatly benefit from a longer preinfusion. 15 seconds just quells sourness. 30 seconds lets bitterness sneak in. 15-30 seconds is now my working range for good flavor.

After moving away from sour coffee, I sometimes still needed to push extremely hard on the Robot arms to produce a full 60 mL of espresso, needed to maintain pressure for over 60 seconds to achieve the desired volume, or cut the pulls at 30s before obtaining the target volume. The long pulls created overly bitter shots, and pull times were inconsistent. Finally, I learned not tamping the grinds in the basket was the key to consistency. First I use a small two-prong dessert fork to break clumps and distribute the grinds in the basket. (No specialized WDT needle tool required.) Then I gently place the Robot tamper in the basket, careful not to drop, rotate, or press it -- only to check that it sits level. (Just look straight down to see the tamper handle is centred in the basket.) Finally, I remove the tamper without disturbing the coffee bed. All this sounds trivial, but pressing the grinds down a little or a lot just makes the pull unnecessarily hard. No tamping also minimizes channeling and boosts the amount of crema.

For the record, I preheat the basket and portafilter on top of a kettle. My glassware is warmed with hot tap water. (Avoid preheating with kettle water as extra heat robs pulled espresso of sweetness.) I use a KinGrinder K4, typically feeding 13 g of beans at 63 clicks to the Robot. I wet a Robot paper filter, stick it to the underside of the Robot metal screen, and gently place the paper and screen on top of the coffee bed (after leveling with a fork and verifying with the tamper).

The Robot is for people who want to understand espresso and take control of every aspect affecting output. It is worth the price when you realize it is cheaper and far more adjustable than electric machines using unpressurized baskets. That level of adjustment is not for the sake of tinkering. It is about reliably getting the best flavors, which is why I use the Robot. I hope this helps others considering the Robot.

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