• Description
  • Specs
  • Method
  • GRIND VERTICALLY WITH PIETRO

    Pietro is the one and only hand grinder with vertical flat burrs, zero retention, and an innovative ergonomic design. It is built with premium and robust materials and the hopper lid and grounds catch have airtight seals to help maintain flavour. Its 58mm flat burrs are designed and made in Italy by Fiorenzato, using M340 steel and are available in two different configurations; versatile MultiPurpose, for espresso to filter, or ProBrew, designed to obtain the best result in filter extractions.

    Designed for outstanding ergonomics, the retractable lever and anti-slip base make the grinding experience easy and more effective. Pietro grinders are built with care, using premium, food-grade materials.

    Pietro MultiPurpose comes standard with Fiorenzato's B-Modal burrs. The B-Modal burr is designed with two precise rings of teeth to create a bimodal grind particle distribution curve, typical of the best espresso grinders and perfect for a balanced and delicious espresso extraction. On top of all of that, the B-Modal burrs create an ideal grind profile for delicious, balanced pourover and filter brews.

    Designed in collaboration with Lance Hedrick, Fiorenzato's M-Modal burr comes standard with Pietro ProBrew. These burrs create a unimodal grind particle distribution curve, reducing fines as much as possible for exceptional clarity and maximum aromatics.

    • Available MultiPurpose or ProBrew burr configurations, in a variety of colourways
    • 58mm flat burrs with dark coating (M-Modal or B-Modal) (Made in Italy by Fiorenzato)
    • Stepless adjustment dial with clicks at every ~15 microns
    • Dimensions: 210 x 115 x 80mm (8.3 x 4.5 x 3.1in)
    • Weight: 1500g (53oz)
    • Beans Capacity: 60g (2.1oz)
    • Material
      • Body: Food-grade plastic and aluminum
      • Magnets: Neodymium
      • Grip: Silicone
      • Burrs: M340 Bohler steel (Food Certified)
  • PIETRO Manual Coffee Grinder - User Manual

    PIETRO Manual Coffee Grinder - Product Brochure

    PIETRO Manual Coffee Grinder - Spec Sheet

pietro fiorenzato commandante kingrinder hand grinder coffee grinder german made porlex polex commandate Timemore Chestnut hand coffee burr grinder Orphan Espresso Fixie lido apex REMI M47 1Zpresso Q2 Zassenhaus Santiago Hario Skerton Akirakoki JavaPresse Aergrind

Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
60%
(3)
40%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
A
A.D. (Calgary, CA)
Incredible cup clarity and sweetness, every, single, time

It truly doesn't matter how you use this grinder or what bean you choose to grind; the PIETRO is an outstanding choice on my bar, and I will usually gravitate towards it every time. The uniformity is outstanding, the finish of the paint is the best version of Matte on the market, and the Forest Green pairs perfectly with the black accents. Worth literally every penny

E
EF (Brooklyn, US)
Pro brewing burrs are amazing

I’m shocked by how much better cups are with my Pietro with the pro brewing burrs…even against my Ode gen 2 with SSPs. Downside is it’s a bit awkward and top heavy. Recommend buying the base.

D
Dan (Chatsworth, CA)
Pietro+April Brewer=Yum

The day i got my Pietro I ran 2kg of coffee through it, most of it medium-light roast, and boy oh boy let me tell you was my stabilizing hand sore. It's the first vertically mounted flat burr manual grinder available on the market. It's not as smooth to grind as a conical grinder with a long crank handle circling atop the grinder; also, the brew burrs only have four pre-breakers, so it makes grinding lighter roasted coffee more of a challenge. I find the grinder catches probably when the beans hit the pre-breakers. When it catches just reverse the handle and keep grinding. It's fine once you get used to it.

Lance recommends holding the grinder against your abdomen to help absorb agitation caused by grinding. This method works and i would recommend it.

Cleaning is just as easy as reviews show it to be. Push the pin turn the handle and pull the rotating burr out. From here you can pull out the stable but for easy cleaning. It's just as easy to reassemble - just make sure the stable burr is turned to the right direction.

I saw a review on this grinder saying that this is a burr first grinder, and I would have to say i agree. I would that the method for grinding is not optimal, however the burrs make super coffee. The burrs designed by Lance Hedrick are amazing and in comparison to my Comandante C40 really extended my brew time by 45sec up to a full minute just because of how uniform the grinds are. As a side note, i brew with the April Plastic brewer and was averaging 2 min brews with my C40 and now get between 245 and 330min brews with my Pietro.

The magnet on the catch cup feels good. When you're grinding, if you hold it against your abdomen you'll hear a click as the catch cup pulls and away from the grinder, specifically when the grinder catches. The catch cup isn't gonna fall off. Also the lid. It's advertised as an air tight seal, but i find that you have to kind of twist the lid slightly so that it catches on the rubber ring. If you don't it'll come off pretty easy.

Overall, the Pietro comes out as a net positive. It's super expensive for a manual grinder and it feels a bit bad that nothing comes with the grinder out of the box. The grinder is heavy at 1.5kg in comparison to my C40 at over 1lb. The grinding is the real hang up here and mostly i would say because of the high price tag. This really is unlike any other manual grinder on the market with burrs that haven't really been applied to manual methods, at least within this price range. With this in mind, i don't think it's all that helpful to detract from the Pietro because the grinding isn't as smooth as a conical hand grinder because, well, it just isn't.

The Pietro is changing what a manual grinder can be, but with that said there are gonna be some hiccups. With any grinder there are some compromises. Does the Pietro grind as smoothly as a C40? No. But the Pietro produces more consistent grinds and I'm happy to trade simplicity of grinding for uniformity of grind.

Bottom line: with all is quirks love my Pietro, thanks Eight Ounce !!

G
Guillaume (Sherbrooke, CA)
I'm discovering what clarity means in a pour over.

Coming from a conical hand grinder this Pietro has been eye-opening. The presentation of coffees with this grinder reveals layers of flavours that are completely muted in my other grinders (kinu, xeoleo ghost burrs). I taste less sweetness but the acidic presence and structure is quite an experience.
Speaking of experience, the ergonomics are awkward. My body is slowly adapting to it. I remember using the Pharos grinder and this is much more fun to use and clean.

M
Mark R. (Edmonton, CA)
Superb grind quality, awkward form factor

I have used this grinder with the Hendrik-designed ProBrew/M-modal burrs daily for approximately 2 weeks. I only use it for pour over and immersion brewing (no espresso). This is the only flat burr hand grinder I have ever used.

The grind quality is second to none: highly uniform grind particles within a narrow band and few fines. The result is flavour clarity and separation as good as any flat burr grinder I have ever used. The only hand grinder I am aware of that comes close is the ZP6; subjectively they seem similar in grind, but I have not compared carefully side by side (yet). I like also the low rpm grinding that is possible here (subject to my upcoming criticism).

I do find using the Pietro grinder to be more awkward to use than other hand grinders. It is clearly meant to be used held against a table or surface, but it is a but tippy and unstable. It’s only a minor annoyance to me, but I think the entire grinder would benefit from a wider base. There is good clearance between the handle and the table, at least for my medium sized hands.

Grinding it held completely in the hands is also awkward, moreso than other hand grinders, but not undoable. It doesn’t seem designed for this type of grinding.

On finer grind settings, the flat burrs sometimes stick or seize momentarily, which gets annoying (although it is perhaps something to be expected of a manual flat burr grinder).

Easy to clean and maintain. The ability to swap out burrs with the bimodal set is also intriguing.

Overall I really like it and the resulting ground coffee is superb. I just wish it was slightly more stable on a table. I would recommend the grinder to someone who wants the best grind quality possible, doesn’t require portability, and who doesn’t mind spending a bit more than a conical burr grinder (at least one of which is very close in grind quality to the Pietro).

Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
60%
(3)
40%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
A
A.D. (Calgary, CA)
Incredible cup clarity and sweetness, every, single, time

It truly doesn't matter how you use this grinder or what bean you choose to grind; the PIETRO is an outstanding choice on my bar, and I will usually gravitate towards it every time. The uniformity is outstanding, the finish of the paint is the best version of Matte on the market, and the Forest Green pairs perfectly with the black accents. Worth literally every penny

E
EF (Brooklyn, US)
Pro brewing burrs are amazing

I’m shocked by how much better cups are with my Pietro with the pro brewing burrs…even against my Ode gen 2 with SSPs. Downside is it’s a bit awkward and top heavy. Recommend buying the base.

D
Dan (Chatsworth, CA)
Pietro+April Brewer=Yum

The day i got my Pietro I ran 2kg of coffee through it, most of it medium-light roast, and boy oh boy let me tell you was my stabilizing hand sore. It's the first vertically mounted flat burr manual grinder available on the market. It's not as smooth to grind as a conical grinder with a long crank handle circling atop the grinder; also, the brew burrs only have four pre-breakers, so it makes grinding lighter roasted coffee more of a challenge. I find the grinder catches probably when the beans hit the pre-breakers. When it catches just reverse the handle and keep grinding. It's fine once you get used to it.

Lance recommends holding the grinder against your abdomen to help absorb agitation caused by grinding. This method works and i would recommend it.

Cleaning is just as easy as reviews show it to be. Push the pin turn the handle and pull the rotating burr out. From here you can pull out the stable but for easy cleaning. It's just as easy to reassemble - just make sure the stable burr is turned to the right direction.

I saw a review on this grinder saying that this is a burr first grinder, and I would have to say i agree. I would that the method for grinding is not optimal, however the burrs make super coffee. The burrs designed by Lance Hedrick are amazing and in comparison to my Comandante C40 really extended my brew time by 45sec up to a full minute just because of how uniform the grinds are. As a side note, i brew with the April Plastic brewer and was averaging 2 min brews with my C40 and now get between 245 and 330min brews with my Pietro.

The magnet on the catch cup feels good. When you're grinding, if you hold it against your abdomen you'll hear a click as the catch cup pulls and away from the grinder, specifically when the grinder catches. The catch cup isn't gonna fall off. Also the lid. It's advertised as an air tight seal, but i find that you have to kind of twist the lid slightly so that it catches on the rubber ring. If you don't it'll come off pretty easy.

Overall, the Pietro comes out as a net positive. It's super expensive for a manual grinder and it feels a bit bad that nothing comes with the grinder out of the box. The grinder is heavy at 1.5kg in comparison to my C40 at over 1lb. The grinding is the real hang up here and mostly i would say because of the high price tag. This really is unlike any other manual grinder on the market with burrs that haven't really been applied to manual methods, at least within this price range. With this in mind, i don't think it's all that helpful to detract from the Pietro because the grinding isn't as smooth as a conical hand grinder because, well, it just isn't.

The Pietro is changing what a manual grinder can be, but with that said there are gonna be some hiccups. With any grinder there are some compromises. Does the Pietro grind as smoothly as a C40? No. But the Pietro produces more consistent grinds and I'm happy to trade simplicity of grinding for uniformity of grind.

Bottom line: with all is quirks love my Pietro, thanks Eight Ounce !!

G
Guillaume (Sherbrooke, CA)
I'm discovering what clarity means in a pour over.

Coming from a conical hand grinder this Pietro has been eye-opening. The presentation of coffees with this grinder reveals layers of flavours that are completely muted in my other grinders (kinu, xeoleo ghost burrs). I taste less sweetness but the acidic presence and structure is quite an experience.
Speaking of experience, the ergonomics are awkward. My body is slowly adapting to it. I remember using the Pharos grinder and this is much more fun to use and clean.

M
Mark R. (Edmonton, CA)
Superb grind quality, awkward form factor

I have used this grinder with the Hendrik-designed ProBrew/M-modal burrs daily for approximately 2 weeks. I only use it for pour over and immersion brewing (no espresso). This is the only flat burr hand grinder I have ever used.

The grind quality is second to none: highly uniform grind particles within a narrow band and few fines. The result is flavour clarity and separation as good as any flat burr grinder I have ever used. The only hand grinder I am aware of that comes close is the ZP6; subjectively they seem similar in grind, but I have not compared carefully side by side (yet). I like also the low rpm grinding that is possible here (subject to my upcoming criticism).

I do find using the Pietro grinder to be more awkward to use than other hand grinders. It is clearly meant to be used held against a table or surface, but it is a but tippy and unstable. It’s only a minor annoyance to me, but I think the entire grinder would benefit from a wider base. There is good clearance between the handle and the table, at least for my medium sized hands.

Grinding it held completely in the hands is also awkward, moreso than other hand grinders, but not undoable. It doesn’t seem designed for this type of grinding.

On finer grind settings, the flat burrs sometimes stick or seize momentarily, which gets annoying (although it is perhaps something to be expected of a manual flat burr grinder).

Easy to clean and maintain. The ability to swap out burrs with the bimodal set is also intriguing.

Overall I really like it and the resulting ground coffee is superb. I just wish it was slightly more stable on a table. I would recommend the grinder to someone who wants the best grind quality possible, doesn’t require portability, and who doesn’t mind spending a bit more than a conical burr grinder (at least one of which is very close in grind quality to the Pietro).